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March 11, 2015 (The Sentencing Project)
Marc Mauer's Testimony to Charles Colson Task Force on Federal Corrections

Marc Mauer testifying to the Colson Task Force

In testimony delivered to the Charles Colson Task Force on Federal Corrections, Marc Mauer, Executive Director of The Sentencing Project, calls for reforms to federal sentencing structures to create an upper limit of no more than 20 years in prison, barring exceptional circumstances. Doing so would reduce the federal prison population considerably, avert unnecessary costs of incarceration, and provide resources for more effective public safety investments.


March 31, 2015 (Los Angeles Times)
Obama commutes prison sentences of 22 drug offenders

In a single stroke, President Obama on Tuesday doubled the number of sentence commutations he has granted to federal prisoners since taking office, clearing the way for the release of 22 drug offenders.

The move was part of an administration effort to reduce disparities in drug sentencing and scale back mandatory minimum prison sentences.


March 21, 2015 (The New York Times)
Too Old to Commit Crime?

In testimony before the Charles Colson Task Force on Federal Corrections, The Sentencing Project's Executive Director Marc Mauer called for reforms to federal sentencing structures to create an upper limit of no more than 20 years in prison, barring exceptional circumstances. The New York Times states that "a compelling case" can be made for such a policy since "long sentences do little to prevent crime":


March 20, 2015 (Toledo Blade)
Time served: Prison sentencing policies should be driven by concerns for public safety, not rage and revenge

In an editorial, the Toledo Blade urges Congress and state legislatures to consider Marc Mauer's proposal to cap federal prison sentences, with some exceptions, at 20 years.


March 19, 2015 (The Hill)
Bipartisan moment for drug sentencing reform

"A generation ago, if you asked a Republican and a Democrat to debate criminal justice policy, they would have argued about which party was toughest on crime," writes The Sentencing Project's Federal Advocacy Counsel Jeremy Haile in The Hill. "Now, they’re arguing the other way: who can be smart."